Episode 5 – Olly Pemberton on Wildlife Conservation Documentary Filming

With Olly Pemberton

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Olly Pemberton — on Capturing the Elusive Snow-Leopard Through the Lens, Wildlife Conservation Projects He Filmed, on Rewilding the Great Outdoors and The Need to Integrate Community into Conservation Stewardship

About Olly Pemberton

Olly Pemberton is an award-winning Director, Producer, Cameraman, Drone pilot, Editor, Sound Technician, Story-teller all rolled into one. Having trained with the Royal Marines Reserves for four years he is well used to being self-sufficient and flexible.

Olly grew up on the Isle of Man, a place which has now received the UNESCO world heritage stamp given to the country as a marine protected area, place which he refers to as the ‘love child of Scotland and Cornwall, Home of the Manx Shearwater’.

Olly has spent the best part of the last decade filming endangered or elusive wildlife, wild snow leopards, sparrow hawks and Italian brown bears among a few. After a solid career as documentary filmmaker for Exodus Travel, he is now branching out filming and directing award-winning documentaries on the interaction between mankind and wild species across the Globe.

His most recent extreme shoot was in Botswana, in the Okavango Delta, filming a people called ‘Polers- guardians of the Okavango delta’, and his firsthand account of these nail-biting boat rides between narrow hippo waters, being charged at, and how Covid has impacted wildlife and poaching.

Olly also takes us on a journey about the human wildlife conflict around Kenya, and the incredible work carried out by the Tsavo Trust, a model called the 10% project, where the trust attempts to maximise the farming yield on farmers lands, while allowing space to roam for wild elephants, concept that is working and mitigates human wildlife conflict.

“The general theme that seems to crop up in the wildlife conservation world, is coexistence. Addressing that in a less romantic fashion, with the honest truth around trials an errors, about how humans and animals do need areas to work and roam.” – Olly Pemberton